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&e that way. in germany it's created 400,000 new jobs. it's created $4 billion in cash flow through the economy and making the german economy the strongest in europe and it's the -- it basically is a policy that pays the homeowners so it makes investing in solar attractive to homeowners. right now it's not attractive to put a hundred solar panels on your roof, but under this policy germany has made tremendous advances. there is one country in the world that is 100% solar power as of last month. cca cannot possibly do what they need done. the word -- you can boil this whole argument down to one question, one word and that is "inevitability". we are running out of the oil. we are drowning in our own waste. we need to stop burning oil and the way you could do it is putting a couple hundred solar panels on each house in san francisco. this was indirectly mentioned in the guardian editorial but they don't say it and it's because they don't understand it. it's important to understand what being done in germany and other countries around the world because by doing this they're crea
. but basically issue selection. within germany the companies have done well, in general it has been an issue selection. ashley: you think of areas being well, europe is not one of them. he mentioned germany, even germany is being dragged down to what is going on in the region as a whole. how do you pick the stocks? you like the multinationals, don't you? >> one thing that we have invested in his multinationals. companies around the world, spain, peril around the world. cars around the world. multinational companies that are doing stuff right in this environment. we think that is the formula, broad-based market and the people that are executing within that. ashley: aren't you concerned about continued volatility in that area? italian elections coming up in february, german elections not far behind that, has to be seen whether angela merkel can survive that. does that give you cause for concern? >> there is no question about that. every election that has happened in the last two or three years, the incumbent has been evicted from office. you can worry about angela merkel, our guess is she is d
was not supposed to live. >> they called me from germany and they said your son is very critical. i don't think so that he make it to america. and then i -- i told them he is coming. >> i promise if you keep him alive for me i will take care of him, i said to god. >> after 81 days in a coma, joel woke up at brook army medical center in it texas. >> i didn't know where i was at. i could have woke up in timbuktu and i didn't know what was going on. it was like really. >> he lost a leg, his eyes, fingers on one hand. suffered a traumatic brain injury and burned on more than 60% of his body. his parents put their lives on hold to be with their son as he learned to walk and speak again and endured dozens and dozens of surgeries and with their support he began his unbelievable recovery. >> joel went from not even walking to walking, talking, running around, dancing and everything. >> then about two years ago joe met andy who had been through a life changing experience of his own when ran to the world trade center on 9/11 to help with the search and rescue. >> i lost three friends than day and i made a p
to get the latest results from germany's survey any second now. in the meantime, i can can bring you news. for example, on industrial orders and sales in italy, orders flat on the month, down .2 on the month for sales and down nearly 5% on the year. so confirming some of the weakness that we know we've seen previously in the italian economy. meanwhile, another gauge perhaps for the euro as we look to the strength of it lately. that's the current counselor plus which in october was an adjusted 3.9 billion euros, up quite a bit from the 2.5 billion reported for september. now that also comes after -- a day after the european union's report suggesting that in fact the european union would have to run a surplus, given its poor demographics over the next couple of years. now let's get a quick preview of the news. for that we head to patricia, awaiting the results. what do we expect to see? >> reporter: we're expecting the second consecutive month to the upside for the business sentiment next year in germany. november was a surprise after six months to the downside. we expect december to book i
are as different as germany and greece. what is it that keeps the united states together? you had a great expression in the 1930 -- you had a great depression here in the 1930's. things were awful. and yet, i do not believe there were any political movements to get rid of the deficit states from the united states, like there are in europe and portugal and spain and everywhere else that happens to be in deficit. the reason is, the federal- state, especially after 1929 plays the role of the regulator of surplus and deficit recycling around the land. let me give you a simple example. we are in seattle. boeing is sponsoring the lectures. when boeing goes to washington to give a contract for the next generation jet or whatever, they may get it. they do get it. but there are some things attached. like for instance, we want a factory that builds the wings are the engines in tennessee or missouri or arizona. in the deficit regions. this is not philanthropy. this is an act of recycling surplus so the surpluses of the surplus state can continue to be created, produced. you may recall that in the 1
is fascinating bearing in mind where we are in terms of the macro story and germany might well be floating -- >> certainly a big departure in the sense that the german stock market has typically traded in line with the german economy and this is a big divergence. so that's a change. but looking over time, all stocks have the component of what they call the economic return. speculative return which is it for change and the valuation that the market puts on it. over time, one is a possum gain and the other is zero sum gain. sometimes good news, sometimes bad news. but over time the kind of net being nothing. >> we'll see what happens. good to have you on. we'll be out in westminster, joined by the british shadow business secretarier to. we'll talk currencies. find out why one strategist is bullish on the currency. after the ramp up in m&a that we've seen this year, we'll also speak to an expert in los angeles that says the fundamentalses for deal activity in 2013 are looking more solid. so where will the money flow in the new year, that's at 11:20. and the outlook for u.s. credit market appe
. an agreement still seems pretty elusive at this moment. germany and french finance ministers have very different views about oversight of banks. and in britain, the chancellor george osbourne delivers his statement to parliament today. will be out in westminster soon. steve is out to give us more detailed analysis of what to expect. let's just go back to the eurozone. as you say, thin advances here. are we capping -- it's up against the yen as well. there's obviously been a big yen story. >> yeah, i think the euro/yen has had perhaps more to do with eu euro/dollar than anything else. the euro crosses in general have been story rather than euro/dollar and euro/yen at the forefront. i think the euro/yen forecast is overplayed in what japan will ultimately deliver on. but mum is pretty good. i think you still play for a little yen weakness. i think we'll see a lot of people trying to buy yen back because i don't think we'll get delivery in all these preelection promises. >> do we all think we know what the chancellor is going to say? >> judging by the many pages being given to it in the n
won't do particularly well, but germany and italy maybe next year have a potential surprise on the upside. >> how much of a surprise? >> it will not be a fast recovery. the ecb will be forced to do more, but they'll be drald dragged into it. so things will have to get worse before they act. so i don't really think -- >> what more actions? they have a t program waiting to go. what more actions are you talking about? >> the key policy rate for the ecb is likely indeed in the first quarter. they can take dpopt deposit rate negative. by the middle of next year, they'll be doing outright qe. i've been talking about this for ages. they haven't done it so maybe they won't do it. but i'm assuming that the outlook for inflation for the eurozone is -- >> how are they going to get around -- look, i know the bundes bank has a fear of hyper inflation. i just don't -- are they going to get around all the -- because even if they do it on the inflation mandate, are they going to get around the objections about outright money printing? germans would see it as that. >> they would see it as ou
is that the youeuropeans are only able to do that because in fact the us army lives in germany and actually picks up their defense tab. you can't do it -- there's nobody to bail out america the way germany's bailing out europe. >> john boehner was on the program the other night. he said hey, i wasn't consulted about this latest offer. i wish i was. this talk about republican conservatives, tea party members that were purged from certain committees because they had a criteria list if they didn't meet or match the leadership vote schedule. is that a message to the more conservative way of the republican party? >> i think so. he's absolutely right to be disturbed about it. it's not john boehner's job to make this math add up. it's not john boehner's job to find ways of funding a three and a half or four trillion dollar budget. it's insane. if the democrats want to have a three and a half, four trillion dollar federal budget, fine. they can be the party of that. there ought to be a party that represents an alternative and john boehner is saying no, we'll help you close that gap. who needs the republican
twice as much as canada and germany. more than twice as much as britain and japan. rationing is supposed to be the lower cost, the american way of rationing costs more. what do we get for all that money? 41 countries have higher average life expectancy. 40 countries have a lower infant mortality rate than we do. we have one of the poorest records of actually curing people of curable diseases in the western world. of our spending still leaves millions without health coverage. does the affordable care act continue or does it disrupted the american way of rationing? i could say it does a little bit of both, but at 2500 pages that actually does a lot of both. first of all, by requiring insurance companies to accept people with preexisting conditions obamacare strikes a major blow against rationing by health condition. i don't think it is possible to overstate the significance of this because it is telling insurance companies they have to fundamentally change the way they do business. their job is to cover sick people as well as healthy ones and that is a very big change for the american insu
and the support groups and we proceeded to attack across into germany. >> there's much more to the story. next, the images he will never be able to forget. >>> 71 years ago following the bombing of pearl harbor, the u.s. entered world war ii. they then moveded into germany and witnessed firsthand horrors of the haolocaust. you're about to see stark images of the war, sights that waitzman say still live with him to this very day. >> our first contact is what we call the holocaust. there was a city of dinslaken. we were greeted with thousands of dead bodies. it was conveyed to us later that the germans poured gasoline on people and burn them alive. we went to nordhausen. we went to this camp. after neutralizing their fire and lowering down the gates, we were again greeted by thousands of dead bodies. we came to a crematorium area. there were 10 or 12 ovens in that camp. most of them the doors were very hot. we got them open, found bones and ashes. we had no idea what to do for these poor people. we gave them sips of water and to not try to do anything else. the medical detachment got there short
't leave germany until 2:00 p.m. and doesn't get back until the 10:00 p.m. hour. meanwhile -- nobody's said this on television, nobody's mentioned this -- they thought they were going to be attacked in tripoli, the embassy was evacuated in tripoli. yet whether they have the injured people on the tarmac, they are severely injured, they send an airplane over to benghazi and they returned to tripoli -- instead of going to italy or to germany -- then the c-17 has to come -- it makes no sense. it makes absolutely no sense. >> greta: the irony and i have no sympathy for the administration's claiming this is politicized because if they would just simply answer these questions, not drag their feet, maybe we will get it in the next 6 or 7 days, but if they would fill in the blanks, nobody would be suspicious. we get silly answers that don't make sense -- that's the problem. that is created by those who hold the facts. >> that's right! i am not trying to politicize this. we have injured americans! in the worst case ttakes 25 hours to extract them to a facility, an american facility, they're in german
shootings in world history. in fact, they both occurred over the last decade was in germany. germany has extremely strict begun control laws. people talk about bans on semiautomatic weapons. you have to undergo two psychological screening tests. both the examples given -- >> i understand. i think everything should be on the table. i don't have a gun, i don't have a bushmaster, i don't know why someone needs 30 rounds necessarily in a magazine, if you're gougt and hunting deer. you make the point these are hunting guns made to look like military guns but they don't have the features of military guns, is that your point? >> that's right. they ban guns based upon how they look, rather than how they function. semiautomatics, one pull of the trig, one bullet comes out. semiautomatics do lots of harm. but the problem is we have to realize that has both costs and benefits. we see the costs here but the benefits are let's say you were attacked by two criminals. would you want to have a gun where you had to manually load the bullets in? if you had a rifle had the pull the bolt back, you may not h
and insulatedding old buildings and creating renewable energy economy like they have done in germany. they have 50% renewables. all of germany is 25-30% renewables. that's mostly solar. germany has less sun than much of america. the idea that is not an economic solution is a complete falsity. we're totally at the point we can do this right now. i think the, you know, we're really in a situation where there's an old paradigm, the oh oh post oil revolution, industry which is very powerful and strong, perhaps the strongest in the world. they obviously want to continue to do things within their paradigm and with their own interests in mind. that's how the free market works, i guess but we have to enlighten the people and make them understand there is nothing safe about this. it's just as dirty as coal, it's going to cause climate change. it's not which fossil fuel we like. this is all about climate change and obviously having clean air and water is important but if we tip the earth into unlivable environment, everybody suffers. in fact, a lot of us are going to perish. so, you know, it seems overly dr
to the rest of the world, if you look at germany, uk, japan, france, all of whom have very strong gun regulations, we have more gun deaths in one week than they have in an entire year, and the incidents -- the number of times in which guns inside a home are used for self-defense are exceedingly small, on the order of maybe 1 in 15, 1 in 20 as compared to the number of times when a gun is used either for suicide or a homicide. anybody that looks at the data here is quite clear that on the whole, particularly things like assault weapons, create far, far more kor nage in th carnage in this country than they prevent. to a large extent the reason why i think progressives have not been able to mount an effective campaign for sensible gun laws, it's been a failure of the progressive movement, and i think that will now change with progressives. they must realize they have to make this an election issue. all of the polls show that the public is widely in favor of sensible gun regulations. i will point out what i said on friday. president clinton after columbine when we were meeting in the oval
was german. >> what's your address in germany? >> hamburg, germany. >> even though they were from germany, could they have had some connection with theal gainian men quinn mentioned in her first call to reid? >> we saw the blue bag. one of the guys was joking and said i'm sure there's money inside. that's a lot of money. what are we going to do with it? >> but in an unbelievable stroke of bad luck it turned out these men were not the kidnappers. >> and it becomes pretty clear pretty quick that these guys were in the wrong place at the wrong time. >> the men were actually college exchange students. two of them played on the same tennis team. >> they looked at a bag and said, hey, wouldn't it be cool if there was some money in that bag and it was that simple, that coincidental and couldn't make it up. >> the college students stumbled on to the bag, picked it up and got scared when they saw cars following them. they then called 911. >> we found a blue bag in a parking lot and there was a lot of money in there and we just want to give it to you guys. >> they came down to jacksonville beach to
. he is in germany in terms of potential. steven leblanc talking texas in the next fox business exclusive you cannot afford to miss, what is he buying now? should you follow? i always wait until the lt minute. can i still ship gift in me r christmas? yeah, se you can. great. where's your gift? uh... whew. [ male annouer ] break om the holiday stress. ship fedex expreress by decber 22nd for christmas delivery. now we need a little bit more... [ malennouncer ] at humana, we understand the value of quality time and personal attention. which is why we are proud to partner with halth care profesonals who understand the difference that quality time with our members can make... that's a very nice cake! ohh! [ giggles ] [ male announcer ] humana thanks the physicians, nurses, hospitals, pharacists and other health professionals who helped us achieve the highest average star rating among national medicare companies... and become the first and only national medicare advantage company to achieve a 5-star rating for a medicare plan... your efforts result in the quality of care and service w
, germany, the u.s., of course, even the soviet union. >> -- tavis: that is my point. everybody seems to be guilty of that over the course of history. i am glad you took a question. what does africa have today that the rest of the world does not prove >> -- does not? >> some possibilities. some structures of spirituality, and i emphasize that, spirituality which is not aggressive. decimating a culture, which christianity is guilty of. islam is guilty of. a tolerant spirituality. in the new world, in brazil, where african religions co have it and become -- where they cohabit. this is a lesson for some of the so-called world religions. they have taken joy in decimating humanity tavis: -- and decimating humanity. tavis: i raise this question. just like china, the world power now advancing in africa, the catholic church has found africa is a place that is very fertile. what say you about the catholic church all of that continent? they are getting new converts daily, hourly. >> a bit more selectivity or control. who is going to argue about the ultimate fundamental? you have a contest for t
. the christmas degree originated in germany based on a prop in a mid evil play commemorating adam and eve then came over to england and eventually the united states. do you know what country the christmas tree tradition came from? >> norway. >> united states? >> isn't it from norway? >> netherlands? >> united states. >> germany? >> germany? >> germany? >> am i right? >> i don't know. i'm just guessing. >> i am german ancestry. >> that hurts that you didn't know that? >> it does. >> what's that big thing right over there. what do you call that. >> a christmas tree. >> i think it's called a christmas tree. can you call it whatever you like as long as the people are with their families there is nothing wrong with it? >> they are calling it a holiday tree in rhode island because they want to be politically correct. >> it's a christmas tree. >> it's a christmas tree. >> i love christmas. >> you know there is a war on christmas, right? >> i haven't heard. >> no. you haven't heard of the war on christmas? >> no. how can you have a war with christmas? santa has a big army. >> they are very little
be integrated into how a nation gets its power. more on that after this break. >>> in germany right now there's been a real revolutionary transformation of the grid there. i have some video looking at what the kind of new german energy future or present looks like. you have times when half the power in germany is being produced by renewables. you have a tremendous explosion of wind and solar generation. how did this happen, dave? how did germany begin to undertake this? >> it's a fascinating story. the german law doesn't cost -- this is what it says. it doesn't cost the government any money. electric rate payers pay an extra fee to subsidize people who install solar or wind. people who install solar and wind are guaranteed a higher than market rate of return for something like a decade. these are called feed-in tariffs to keep with green's, you know, aptitude for great terminology. >> screw it. tomorrow we're doing an how on that. >> yes. i had dinner with the parliamentian in germany that got this passed last year. i asked him, this one law is like a lever transforming one of the biggest ind
in germany or alabama. want them in lexington, kentucky or china? >> you mentioned germany. volkswagen opened a plant in chattanooga a few months ago, 2,000 new jobs. bob corcoran was down there. 2,000 jobs, every one of which started at $14.50 an hour. >> right. they're not all going to be at -- >> so volkswagen was moving these jobs here because we're the low wage country compared to germany. >> dude, are you suggesting we push these jobs away? >> i'm not. >> i would rather americans have a shot at a $17 an hour job than having it in china. >> i agree. >> find a way to do better. i actually agree with you. but you have to understand the consequences are pretty severe for american lifestyles. >> again, though, i'm sorry, mike, but the consequences are, we have two choices, we can't get 1965 wages, we either have these jobs in china or lexington, either have them in alabama or germany and this is at least for some of -- a chance for younger americans to get some good jobs. >> joe, if you're taking a job that pays $14.50 an hour. it means one of two things, a, you don't have a job so you're ge
, 1.63. and bond yields higher. they got kicked higher in germany post that survey which we broke on the show, as well. as far as the currency market, dollar bit under pressure ahead of the fed. euro/dollar 130.08. we were down late friday and early monday trade, as well. dollar/yen, highs polls suggest mr. erbe will be a clear win in japan. however big will the lead be and what influence tell have on the bank of japan. dollar and yen pressured by more q.e. talk. and aussillar three-month high. the prospect of q.e. boosting commodityets. canadian doing well. firm at 1.6122. we have more on the asian trading day out of singapore. >> reporter: hi, thank you, ross. most asian markets finished on a bright note. the shanghai composite recouped morning losses in positive territory. property stocks turned higher in the afternoon. stocks also rallied while investors await beijing's detailed plan on urban development. strengthening main line blue chips pushed the hang seng to a 16-month high. developers, industrials, and gaming stocks among the top gamers today. >>> in japan the country's
to this, ambassador burt was the u.s. ambassador to the federal republic of germany from 85-89, and before that worked in the state department as assistant secretary of state for european and canadian affairs and 83-85. and before that was the direct of political military affairs in the department of state. so he, along with his colleagues, has a long and eminent involvement of these issues but and finally last but not least, ambassador matlock, known to many of us, career ambassador, he's been holding a series of academic posts. i'm not going to list them all, since 1981, 91, excuse me. but during his 35 years in the american foreign service, 1956-91, he served as ambassador to the soviet union from 1987-1991, a special assistant to the president for national security affairs, and senior director for european and soviet affairs on the national security staff from 83-86. and as ambassador to czechoslovakia from 81-83. i will not go over the rest of his eminent and long career in the interest of time, but i just did want to give you a brief recap of all three of them. and, of course, marvin
during the november 2012 fighting. iraq's president has arrived in germany for further treatment after having a stroke them that he was taken to hospital monday night but doctors have reported the stabilized him. he has had a series of health problems in recent years. a shake-up at the u.s. state department. who is out of a job following the findings of a security investigation. women using technology to build their business. the those headlines in just a moment. >> it is a very unsettled picture across europe. we have this area of low pressure. this frontal system giving some torrential rainfall. and improvement here but on the forward edge of this frontal system there is likely to be some snow extending down toward the alpine region. some shower weather for the u.k. and much of france, too. over eastern parts of europe seeing cloudy skies, outbreaks of rain. -14 degrees is expected in moscow. we have a fairly brisk, northwesterly wind making an impact all the way down towards sudan seeing temperatures below average at 29 degrees. as we move into central parts of africa, while the mon
that account for rising income inequality in canada or, indeed, even in france, in germany, in the united kingdom? i mean, it's happening all over the world, it's also happening in emerging markets. but i think it is important to face that scary because if you see it just as a political phenomenon, you know, you're going to lose sight of what i think is the biggest challenge which is that these, actually, quite benign economic forces, right? i love the technology revolution, i'm a google addict. they're also drivers of social and political consequences which are not quite so benign. the way i like to look at it, and this is a quote from peter orszag, is, you know, how he sees it is he said, look, the big drivers are probably these economic forces, but the issue is that particularly in the united states the politics instead of trying to mitigate these very powerful economic forces has exacerbated them. so even as you have these economic forces creating much, much more concentration at the very top, you expect politics to sort of try to so much that blow. social institutions to soften that
germany but there is in english strain as well. the queen mother was from an english slavish scottish family. it is a mix. there is a significant german lineage. it was a problem right before world war i when the family name was very germanic and her grandfather king george five change the names of all people so they were less germanic and other names were
was released from hospital early this week. >> a very special honor for a who survive germany's concentrating camps. white lighting the menorah is just the beginning of the celebration. put the scarves a 99-year-old holocaust menorah int a ohio. s, says it's a miracle he survived the holocaust to make it this far. will celebrate turning 100 . ter this week the national menorah was lit time ago. t was the first of hanukkah will be the second night. guests were treated to u.s. navyes by the band and the three tenors. and a beautiful night. different this year. it looks really bright. about the weather. folks are saying where is winter? going to finally have colder air? >> it is the second night of hanukkah and we are looking at a bit of fog outside. visibility at reagan national down to 3 miles. this is looking right down and you can avenue hardly see the capitol building in the center of your screen. look for reduced visibility. wind chill not a problem with f the northeast at 3 miles an hour. the wind will ease as you move through the night and that's why looking at the fog. 52 degrees was i
in the row is president obama. heads of state occupy six of the top 10 spots with germany's chancellor angela merkel and vladimir putin drinking at two and 3. also making the list, bill gates. and pope benedict -- who is now on twitter. and by the way, mr. facebook is not on the list. >> really? >> he dropped off. >> i wonder if steve jobs would have made it? >> there is a lot of power there. the power of letting us know what is going to happen the next couple of days. >> up, down. up down. is a bumpy seven-day forecast in terms of temperatures. i think that is the best way to put it. you mentioned it is good weather for hockey. i want to take you to the rooftop camera. i zoomed in across the river. people are enjoying probably of their lunch breaks. it is actually good weather if you get outside and skates. the last few days, the ice was rather soft. but today, only 41. cooler air -- we do notd. it is very calm at this time. it is light and variable. then it ships southerly. 39 in martinsburg and papers were -- gaithersburg. chilly all across the board. compare that to this time yesterday? l
industry in germany? at t. rowe price, we understand t connections of a complex, global economy. it's just one reason over 75% of our mutual funds beat their 10-year lipper average. t. rowe price. invest with confidence. request a prospectus or summary prospectus with investment information, risks, fees and expenses to read and conder carefully before investing.
germany to somehow get revenge against hitler. they were looking after their only tribal interests, they were not patriotic, and in a funny way he accused the jews of everything that billy graham's and protestants accused his son of when he ran for the presidency in 1960. he didn't believe it was possible to be a jew and to be a true patriot at the same time and those who opposed his son's election because he was roman catholic he said you couldn't be a catholic and a true blooded american at the same time because they couldn't turn him down. is it true kennedy's views about the future of the stock market was influenced by his bootblack one day was giving him advice on the marquette and supposedly kennedy had said on his way to his office he thought something is wrong when they give me advice? >> it's a great story. i found no evidence. it may be true. there are some stories they found no evidence for. i didn't include it in my book because i couldn't verify it. but kennedy didn't need it to tell him that. kennedy was really smart. and when you look back at the crash of 1929, as wh
, including canada, germany, great britain, japan, france-- why are their gun deaths so much lower than ourselves? i mean, john howard, a very conservative prime minister-- former prime minister of australia said we don't want the american disease in australia. why is it that all these other countries don't seem to have this problem? >> well, they have soo they have a homicide problem. they have a violent crime problem. in britain, it's four times what ours is. they don't have as many guns. that doesn't prevent killing. it doesn't prevent mayhem. it doesn't prevent violent crime. >> schieffer: you don't really believe people armed with baseball pats batcan somehow kill more people than people armed with guns. >> in this country, more people are beaten to death than are killed by long guns. >> schieffer: the people who are surviving gunshot wounds now, it's because we have better medical help, david, for the same reason-- >> that's good. >> schieffer: yes, it's good. it's the same reason more of our people are surviving on the battlefields, but that's not the end of it. why do you-- why
my wife and daughter in germany. i miss you, love you and will see you soon.it comes we understand. milies fa, at usaa, we know military life is different. we've been there. that's why every bit of financial advice we offer is geared specifically to current and former military members and their families. [ laughs ] dad! dad! [ applause ] ♪ [ male announcer ] life brings obstacles. usaa brings advice. call or visit us online. we're ready to help. but with advair, i'm breathing better. so now i can be in the scene. advair is clinically proven to help significantly improve lung function. unlike most copd medications, advair contains both an anti-inflammatory and a long-acting bronchodilator working together to help improve your lung function all day. advair won't replace fast-acting inhalers for sudden symptoms and should not be used more than twice a day. people with copd taking advair may have a higher chance of pneumonia. advair may increase your risk of osteoporosis and some eye problems. tell your doctor if you have a heart condition or high blood pressure before taking
because most people in this town, and the media do not know that germany is approaching 100% renewable energy and there is already a nation that is 100% solar and the cca plan is just failure. designed to fail, so if you're not aware of that, if you never heard that before you should talk to somebody who knows and there's people who have written books on this how this policy must fail. it's just scientifically designed upside down and backwards. it can't possibly succeed but san francisco needs because we're a leadership town we need a policy that will win. the mayor talked to the mayor of freeberg germany who has a policy and we think we should talk to them over there. thank you. >> thank you. is there any other member of the public that would like to speak? seeing none public comment is closed. colleagues i think i have a sense how we should proceed and we will move forward and introduce a resolution expanding the ability of staff to focus on other issues besides cca and we will work with our staff to figure out the most ix pidishes way to bring the position in house, and one o
we had in 2008, 2009. very different from the early 1980s. second, germany, including the rest of the european union seems to be going into a recession and germany entering it means 2013, first half, is going to be very difficult. chinese growth slowed significantly. i can't see where the u.s. growth will come from. exports will suffer. >> jim, we are seeing a lot of activity at the end of the year as investors and companies try to beat those higher tax rates. for example, some companies issuing special dividends because they assume tax rates will go up next year, which will they will, but you don't think it is good for toward the special dividends we are seeing. >> i'm okay if it is a dividend-paying company, like utility companies or high-yield staple stock or something. if they're going to pay a special head -- because that's why shareholders buy their company. i'm not okay with it in areas where i make an investment for companies for growth and they come up and pay me a special dividend this year. it makes me weary. if the best i can get is they will pay their cash to pay a
. the imf estimateds that the u.k. next year will grow more strongly than france or germany, and our credible fiscal policy allows for supported monetary policy. and with the bank of england, we are directly addressing the problems of tight credit through the 70 billion pound funding for lending scheme. in the opr's view today, this has lowered interest rates in the real economy and will add to the level of real gdp. one area where the british economy has done much better than forecast is in creating jobs. since early 2010 the private sector has created 1.3 -- 1.2 million new jobs, 600,000 more than was predicted, and youth unemployment has been falling. instead of peaking at 8.7%, the ob russian expects the peak at 8.3%. this at a time when the unemployment rate in spain is 26%, in france it is almost 11%, and across the whole eurozone it is almost 12%. employment, already at a record high, is set to go on rising each year of the forecast, and for every one job less in the public sector, two new jobs are expected to be created in the private sector. britain now has a greater proport
this crisis very well. germany, for example, is doing much better than the united states. the employment has shrunk to the last few years. basically cause the entire crisis. we began at about 5%. we went up to 10% in vietnam at eight and a half%. does not a recovery at all. the germans a doing well. they have one of the best safety nets in europe. there provision of services for other people has not been icons of their having a hard time. the other parts of europe that are doing quite nicely as scandinavia. famous for the quality and quantity of their safety. the idea that european problems because they have the sickened at requires you not to know much . the store. having said that, the crisis is very real in your, and i would urge all of you to pay attention because europe is a very, very important player in the world. in many ways the number one player. but if you take that european market together more people and more product. that is a very important part of the world economy, as important as the american states. also the place in the world that has had more violent warfare among dismem
catholicism and culminating in the horrors of nazism which implicated not only germany but many other nations as well. europe and the u.s. until recently liked to think these dark times were in the past and religious violence was somewhere else, in societies more allegedly primitive, less characterized by heritage of christian values. today we have many reasons to doubt that. our situation calls urgently for critical self examination as we try to uncover the roots of ugly fears and suspicions that currently disfigure all western democracies. in april of 2011 a lot affect in france according to which it is illegal to cover the face in any public space from march to marketplaces to shops, although the law does not mention the word women, muslim, bertha or bail it was introduced by president nicolas sarkozy and a ban on muslim veiling which according to him imprisons women and threatens french values of dignity and equality. the new law makes illegal the barca but france is the first country to enact a full ban on the burke that in public space similar restrictions of being considered all over e
and finance merging, finance taking over industry, which was what pretty well happened in germany. this was never the case. the united states had a very, very broad financial ostentation . the decentered financial system and one in which financial markets therefore broaden the but not linked directly to particular industries. in their function became that of developing financial instruments which will allow finance to go into the market as individual firms and issue commercial paper to raise their money rather than getting it to wrigley from lynx to particular financiers. that led eventually to the world emulating the rest of the markets. the german banks which were so closely integrated into their industry. deutsche bank is not in distinguishable from goldman. and it explicitly said is a began to shift toward becoming an investment bank along the lines of wall street's, we would be engaging conflict of interest if we are writing ipos for firms that now we are deeply integrated with. they end up owning almost all the mortgages in black cleveland at the time of the 2000 crash. deut
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